rosaioko
So...I said I wasn't going to watch this for a while since the first episode was really kind of frustrating and we're heading into finals.


...I lied?

I really didn't want to study for physics, okay )

So, tl;dr - some improvement? Not great but I wasn't skipping over as much stuff and Yoshitarou seems to be growing somewhat of a backbone re: siblings (though I still want to throw the supervisor out the nearest available window) and there was more Holmes and Yoshitarou interactions.

For the moment I'm still watching, though with reservations >>
 
 
Current Location: the eastern tower
Current Mood: discontent
 
 
rosaioko
10 March 2012 @ 11:43 pm
So I spent most of spring break going "hey I should really update dw/lj/etc and like, let people know I'm alive/what's been going on in my life" and then getting distracted by something shiny or going back to attempting to get homework done or what have you so now its the end of spring break and I probably should be in bed but I'm trying to get better at this whole updating thing damn it :l So here we go :D

Cut to save people's flists )

tl;dr - Life is busy but okay, summer is looking busier all the time, I can't wait to be done with classes and I STILL NEED MY COPY OF WILD AT HEART DAMMIT

Oh and I saw The Artist. It was really good! :D A bit darker than I'd expected, but good :D
 
 
Current Location: the eastern tower
Current Mood: giddy
 
 
rosaioko
13 February 2012 @ 11:05 pm
I AM OFFICIALLY DONE WITH MY THESIS. FUCK YES.

For those interested in reading it, I am actually quite proud of the damn thing and would love to hear your thoughts :D It is about 50 pages long, I should warn you, but not terribly dense? Or at least not to me, but then, I wrote it. Here's the abstract, if you're wondering what its about:

In recent years, manga, anime and other elements of Japanese pop culture have gained increasing popularity in the United States. This has led to a wider awareness of Japanese culture through the appropriation these pop culture materials as a source of cultural information. Manga, in particular, provides visual as well as linguistic examples of Japanese culture, and thus has the potential to be an excellent source of cultural knowledge, perhaps even suitable for classroom use. However, as with any cross-cultural text, manga's ability to serve as an example of Japanese culture depends heavily on how it is translated.
Currently, most manga is translated for the purpose of entertainment, not scholarly discussion. Consequently, there is considerable push from publishing companies to gloss translations with Western ideas and cultural norms, on the assumption that the stories will then be more accessible to readers and have higher sales. Unfortunately, with growing awareness of the Japanese origins of manga, rewriting can instead lead to widespread misunderstanding of Japanese culture as being very similar to Western culture, especially when the series' pointedly retain their Japanese setting. This loss of cultural context and the misconceptions it encourages on the international stage are here exemplified through a case study of the English translation of the sports manga, The Prince of Tennis.

Yes, I used The Prince of Tennis in my thesis. Yes, I passed around books at my presentation. Yes, it was beautiful.

Link under here )

The file is a pdf, if anyone can't read that let me know. Also, there will be a proper life update entry at some point, but right now I have too much to do, so all you get is yes I'm alive, yes I have my JET interview information, yes I have too much homework and no I am not getting enough sleep.
 
 
Current Location: the eastern tower
Current Mood: ecstatic